Orchards and fruit in North Cumbria

This section is under development. Eventually we hope to have details on fruit varieties and the orchards where they may be found, with links between them. At the present time, two lists are provided: one of apple varieties which originate locally or are known to grow and produce (reasonably) well, and one of orchards open to the public. Pear and plum varieties may be added later. Suggestions for additions to this page are welcome.

Apple varieties grown in North Cumbria

Varieties are listed below in alphabetical order. The information is derived from various sources, including NCOG members and South Lakes Orchard Group. The apples listed are not necessarily recommended by members - it is simply a list of apples which are grown in the county. A more authoritative list is available here. Please consult with other members before deciding on which trees to plant.

Fruit identification:- Many of the pictures are provided courtesy of www.orangepippin.com where further details of these and other apples can be found. The FruitID website provides a comprehensive fruit identification system, but is quite complex to use; the number of varieties included is increasing all the time. For further information on FruitID, there is a project leaflet and a newsletter (Autumn 2012). If you would like to contribute to this section or the FruitID site, please contact the webmaster.
Colour code: Green=Cooking, Red=Dessert, Amber=Dual purpose

Adam's Pearmain

Adam's Pearmain

Aromatic dessert apple. Not local, but resistant to scab and suitable for North-West England. Keeps well.


Allington Pippin

Allington Pippin

Sharp dessert apple. Can also be used for cooking and cider. Not local, but resistant to scab and suitable for North-West England.


Annie Elizabeth

Annie Elizabeth

Cooking apple. Not a local apple, but widely grown in the area. Strong growing. Keeps well. It is supposed to be disease resistant, but many find it susceptible to scab in our wet conditions.


Ashmead's Kernel

Ashmead's Kernel

Widely-grown russet. Sweet, rich, aromatic dessert apple. Also good for cider (should you have an excess). Scab-resistant.


Autumn Harvest

Autumn Harvest

Westmorland apple, once widely planted in Cumbrian farm orchards. Green dual purpose early apple. Copes well with the cool wet conditions.


Belle de Boskoop

Belle de Boskoop

Dutch apple, but suited to the area as it is vigorous and very disease resistant. Sharp dessert apple or use in cooking, when it holds its shape. Keeps well.


Blenheim Orange

Blenheim Orange

18th century dual-purpose apple. Keeps well. Sweet crumbly texture - good with cheese or in "Apple Charlotte". Appears to do well in our wet cool climate.

 

Bradley's Beauty

Bradley's Beauty

Newly-discovered local (South Lakes) dual-purpose apple.Vigorous and very disease resistant. Keeps well.


Brownlees' Russet

Brownlees Russet

Sweet-sharp dessert russet apple from Hampshire. Very disease resistant and so may be suitable for the area, but needs a good summer for best results. Keeps well.


Burr Knot

Burr Knot

Burr knot is a widely used term to describe a type of tree with roots on the stem. There are several sub-varieties. In Cumbria a variety is grown which is an early cooker and is hardy and disease-resistant.


Carlisle Codlin

Carlisle Codlin

A hardy yellow cooking apple for early season use.


Charles Ross

Charles Ross

Charles Ross can be used as a dessert variety. The flavour is quite sharp in September but sweetens if you keep it. It is also a useful cooking variety. When fresh from the tree the flesh does not entirely breakdown into a puree. Hardy and disease-resistant.

 

Churn Lid

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 Local cooking apple


Claygate Pearmain

Claygate Pearmain

Late russet apple with a strong sweet-sharp flavour. Scab-resistant

 

Cockpit (Improved)

 Cockpit Improved

Thick-skinned Yorkshire mid-season cooking apple. Very disease-resistant.

 

Discovery

Discovery

Commonly grown early dessert apple. White/pink flesh - crisp, firm and juicy. Hint of strawberry. Scab resistant. Some reports of canker problems, but many grow it successfully in the county.


Duchess of Oldenberg Duchess of Oldenberg

Duchess of Oldenburg is a very attractive early-season apple, originating from Russia in the early 18th century.  It is primarily used as a cooking apple. As might be expected, Duchess of Oldenburg is a very hardy apple tree and is disease-resistant

 

Duke of Devonshire

Duke of Devonshire

Local (South Cumbrian) dessert apple. Keeps well. Sweet-sharp and aromatic. Very scab resistant and well-suited to the area. Allow to mature in store before eating.


Epicure Epicure

Small, firm early apple. Very good dessert quality. Appears to cope well with our cool wet climate.

 

Forty Shilling

Forty Shilling

Pleasant mid-season yellow dessert apple from the Carlisle area.


George Cave

George Cave

Red/green conical dessert apple. Early-maturing - best eaten straight from the tree, when it is crisp and juicy. Does not keep and soon drops. Appears to cope well with our wet cool climate.

 

Golden Noble

Golden Noble

Fine late season cooking apple. Good disease resistance

 

Golden Spire

Golden Spire

Golden yellow cooking apple originating from Lancashire. Early season, but doesn't fall quickly from the tree. AKA Tom Matthews cider apple. Not very vigorous but fruits well.


Greenup's Pippin

Greenup's Pippin

Found in the garden of Mr Greenup, of Keswick, Cumberland. Grown throughout the Border Counties in the 19th century. A dual purpose apple, soft juicy white flesh, quite sharp. Cooks to a well flavoured froth or puree.


Grenadier

 Grenadier

Large early cooker. Good for baking. Disease-resistant.

 

Howgate Wonder

 Howgate Wonder

Very large late cooking apple. Keeps well and can be eaten when mature. Keeps shape when cooked.

 

 Irish Peach

Irish Peach

Good flavoured sweet-sharp early apple best eaten straight from tree.


Katja (Katy)

Katy

Early dessert apple, widely grown in the County. Sweet and juicy. Strong grower and canker-resistant. 


Keswick Codlin

Keswick Codlin

Widely grown local apple. Cooks to a puree. Scab resistant. A must for any Cumbrian orchard.


Lady's finger of Lancaster

Lady's Finger of Lancaster

Lancashire cooking apple. 


Lancashire Pippin

Lancashire Pippin

Lancashire/Westmorland cooking apple. Hardy and disease resistant


Lanes Prince Albert

Lane's Prince Albert

Widely grown acid cooking apple. Keeps well. Resistant to scab & canker and does well in the local area.


Laxton’s Superb

Laxton's Superb

Good keeping dessert with Cox-like flavour. Allegedly disease resistant, but does better in some locations than others. There are reports of trees in the county with severe scab and canker.


Longstart

Longstart

Westmorland dual purpose mid-season apple.

 

Lord Derby

Lord Derby

Good quality mid-season Victorian cooking apple. Strong & sharp. Keeps shape when cooked. Disease resistant and does well locally.

 

Lord Grosvenor

Lord Grosvenor

Early cooking apple. Not very vigorous, but good cropper. Break up when cooked, but not to a fluff.

 

Lord Lambourne

Lord Lambourne

Juicy, aromatic and sharp mid-season dessert apple. Some scab resistance.

 

 Maltster

Maltster

Crisp and juicy early / mid-season dual purpose apple. Looks like a modern apple (and is slightly bland), but actually 19th century. Appears to do well in our wet cool climate.

 

Manks Codlin

Manks Codlin

Early yellow cooking apple from the Isle of Man

 

Margil

Margil

Very old mid-season dessert apple with a well-balanced flavour. Quite small, but aromatic.

 

Monarch

Monarch

Excellent mid-season cooking apple, well suited to the region. Likes a wet climate and is very scab-resistant. Cooks to a puree. Sharp, but not as acid as Bramley. Excellent for baking.

 

Nelson’s Favourite

Nelson's Favourite

Mid-season cooking apple from the Kendal area.

 

Newton Wonder

Newton Wonder

Late season cooking apple. Sweeter than Bramley. Cooks to a puree. Scab and canker resistant. Widely grown in Cumbria.

 

Orleans Reinette

Orleand Reinette

A fine dessert apple, given a warm wall. Used in cooking by the French. A vigorous tree which is scab and canker resistant, so will grow well in the area, although maybe not produce the best fruit.

 

Pitmaston Pine Apple

Pitmaston Pine Apple

Small, pineapple-flavoured mid-season dessert apple, much enjoyed by connoisseurs. Scab-resistant.

 

Rank Thorn

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Mid-season dessert apple from Westmorland, much better than the name implies.

 

Red Devil

Red Devil

Mid-season relative of Discovery, with more pronounced red flesh and pink juice. Scab-resistant.

 

Rev. W. Wilks

Rev W Wilkes

Early season cooking apple. Crops well in the region. Same parentage as Monarch. Some scab and canker resistance, but can be challenged by our wet conditions. Often badly biennial.

 

Ribston Pippin

Ribston Pippin

Famous Yorkshire dessert apple – probably the parent of Cox. Aromatic & more acid than Cox – best kept before eating. Despite being quoted as of doubtful disease resistance, it appears to grow well in Cumbria.

 

Rosemary Russet

Rosemary Russet

Late dessert apple with good disease resistance.

 

St Edmund's Pippin

 St Edmund's Pippin

Sweet mid-season dessert apple. Leave to mature on tree. Good disease resistance & grown in Cumbria.

 

Scotch Bridget

Scotch Bridget

Good flavoured apple which can be eaten raw by January. One of the best apples for juicing and grows well in the North-West.

 

Sunset

Sunset

Good alternative to Cox. Similar flavour and much easier to grow, although quite a small fruit. Carefully kept, will last to December. Some reports of canker problems, but many grow it successfully in the county.

 

Tom Putt

Tom Putt

Mid-season cooking and cider apple. Very scab-resistant and canker-resistant, but young bark is susceptible to damage. Vigorous and a good cropper.

 

 Winston

Winston

AKA Winter King. Late season apple. Keeps exceptionally well. Vertical habit. Very disease resistant.

 

Orchards in North Cumbria

Acorn Bank
www.nationaltrust.org.uk/acorn-bank
National Trust garden near Temple Sowerby. Best known for its collection of 250 herbs and traditional fruit orchards. Sample the tea room menu with culinary herbs from the garden used daily in soups, salads and scones, and fruit from the orchards used in delicious puddings and cakes. Stroll along the Crowdundle Beck to the partially restored watermill.

Dalemain
www.dalemain.com
Historic house and gardens near Ullswater. The ancient apple trees in the garden are named 18th/19th century varieties with nearly 30 different kinds. The fruit from these trees is used in the tearoom in several of the delicious recipes available throughout the year.

Hutton-in-the-forest
www.hutton-in-the-forest.co.uk
Historic house and gardens 6 miles north of Penrith. Some fruit trees in the walled gardens.

Mirehouse
www.mirehouse.com
Historic house and gardens by Bassenthwaite Lake. An orchard of traditional Cumbrian fruit trees was planted in the mid 1990's

Winderwath
www.visitcumbria.com/evnp/winderwath-gardens/
Garden open to the public. Includes an old orchard to one side of the garden.

Other orchards in Cumbria and further afield

Brantwood
www.brantwood.org.uk
Historic house and gardens at Coniston which was once home to John Ruskin. Includes an orchard.

Levens Hall
www.levenshall.co.uk
Historic house and garden south of Kendal. The renowned topiary garden also incorporates a small orchard of apple trees and medlars, a nuttery and herb garden.

Sizergh Castle
www.nationaltrust.org.uk/sizergh
Historic house and garden south of Kendal. A number of local apple varieties in the orchard.